Originally a rag-tag team of creatures who would normally be sworn enemies, brought together by the threat of annihilation, this clan has become a disciplined army of the United Sanctuary. Wielding the power of light in one hand and the power of darkness in the other, the Gold Paladins defend the Sanctuary to the finish.

 

V Series Gold Paladin plays a lot like its former self: superior calling units from the top of the deck and gaining skills based off of the number of units called. This style is very synergistic, as one call can lead to another call and amass an army in an instant.

The deck is a pressure machine, calling units as early as turn 1 to push your opponent consistently throughout the game. If the opponent fails to fight back, even for a turn, then the game is all but won.

The strength of this deck draws from one key card: Agravain. Once on grade 3, Agravain can turn three front row rear guards into a seven attack turn for only 1 counterblast! His two skills work together, and after multi attacking relentlessly he can use the soul he has acquired to prevent the opponent from calling any grade 0s, which is truly a game-winning effect.

 

Pros

  • Strong early game

  • Large amount of multi-attacking

  • Explosive Grade 3 turns

  • Multiple finishers

Cons

  • Shut down by defensive triggers

  • Over-reliance on riding Agravain

  • Difficulties hitting Force numbers

 

Knight of Fury, Agravain

Grade 3 

4 Copies

Main Vanguard

Liberator of the Flute, Escrad

Grade 2

4 Copies

Free call on-place on Escrad/Agravain

Stronghold of the Black Chains, Hoel

Grade 1

4 Copies

Column buffer

Dantegal

Grade 0

4 Copies

Elixir Sommelier

Grade 0

4 Copies

Full Cavalier Dragon

Grade 3

3 Copies

Enables more calls for a SB

Knight of Hard-Work, Alienor

Grade 2

4 Copies

24K beater that shoves to soul

Little Battler, Tron

Grade 1

4 Copies

Calls on-hit

Greeting Drummer

Grade 0

4 Copies

Spring Breeze Messenger

Grade 0

1 Copy

Battlefield Storm, Sagramore

Grade 3

4 Copies

Call enabler

Advance of the Black Chains, Kahedin

Grade 2

4 Copies

Call enabler, combos w/ Hoel

Knight of Sound Health, Cunedagius

Grade 1

2 Copies

Column buffer

Halo Shield, Mark

Grade 0 

4 Copies

 

Knight of Fury, Agravain

Grade 3 

4 Copies

Main Vanguard

Blazing Lion, Platina Ezel

Grade 3

2 Copies

Drive check manipulation

Advance of the Black Chains, Kahedin

Grade 2

3 Copies

Call enabler, combos w/ Hoel

Listener of Truth, Dindrane

Grade 1

4 Copies

Draw/CC

Fortune Bell

Grade 0

4 Copies

Spring Breeze Messenger

Grade 0

1 Copy

White Hare in the Moon's Shadow, Pellinore

Grade 3

3 Copies

Superior reride

Liberator of the Flute, Escrad

Grade 2

4 Copies

Free call on-;place on Escrad/Agravain

Knight of Phosphorescence, Langlee

Grade 2

1 Copy

Denies intercept

Knight of Vitality, Brennius

Grade 1

3 Copies

Call enabler that pushes to soul

Halo Shield, Mark

Grade 0

4 Copies

Full Cavalier Dragon

Grade 3

2 Copies

Enables more calls for a SB

Cloudwing Eagle

Grade 2

3 Copies

Buffs itself with calls

Stronghold of the Black Chains, Hoel

Grade 1

4 Copies

Column buffer

Dantegal

Grade 0

4 Copies

Elixir Sommelier

Grade 0

4 Copies

 

If played correctly, Gold Paladin has one of the best early games in the format. As an Accel deck with the game plan of going wide, dealing damage early on can lead to higher chances of winning. In the mulligan you want to keep Agravain, Escrad, and pair copies of Kahedin/Hoel. Cards that require multiple calls to be good like Cundedaguis, Arienohl, and all of the backup grade 3s are better off left out of your opening hands and sent back during the mulligan. Our ideal starting hand lets us assemble a board on turn 2 without having to commit too many cards from hand.

The best card to see on turn 1 is Tron, as his on hit pressure can punish opponents who keep greedier hands with more normal units then triggers. If going first, it’s best to keep Tron in hand for a rear-guard on turn 2, and when going second, he’s your ideal first ride target. The deck thrives off the free calls it can get this way, and the high roll of calling something like a Full Cavalier Dragon can set you super far ahead, basically for free.

On turn two the optimal ride is Escrad, calling you a card from the top of the deck with no cost at all. The card is not once per turn and doesn’t restrict himself from calling more copies of himself too, so it’s possible to have turns like ride Escrad, call another Escrad off the top of the deck, then do the skill again for one more call. That’s potentially two front row rear guards all because of one free on ride skill. Now of course this won’t happen all the time, however even if the unit called is a trigger, Escrad has a second skill of counterblast 1 to give himself 5k power. Placed behind the Vanguard, that makes your worst-case scenario a 19k center column, which isn’t bad at all.

The second best card to see on grade 2 is Kahedin. Kahedin’s cost is counterblast 1 and discard 1 to check the top 3 cards of your deck and call a card from among them. If you have Hoel on the field, you can draw one card from Kahedin’s skill, recovering the cost you paid earlier. Hoel is good even if you don’t have the Kahedin. Hoel's skill gives 5k power to whatever is placed in front of him. Hoel behind any grade 2 unit is a 22k column, which is good enough to swing at Protect/Accel vanguards and force 15k shield. Kahedin on the field turns those 22k columns into 27k columns, forcing out 20k shield from any non-Force deck.

When calling an early board, don’t call down too many rear-guard boosters from hand. Agravain plays 8 front triggers, making it so your smaller boards still have a possibility to hit through a defensive trigger.

If your hand is clunky, it’s best to not commit early and hold back till later. This deck has some massive comeback potential, so while early game is important, you don’t want to be forcing anything either. It’s okay to just call a vanguard booster and swing with one lane in the early game because Agravain scales well into the late game. Push when appropriate but save most of your hand for your big Agravain plays.

 

Midgame is where you ride Agravain and allow your deck to make powerful plays. Agravain’s skill is counterblast 1 and put all your rear-guards into your soul, then look at the same number of cards from the top of your deck as the number of rear-guards you called this turn, call any number from among them to rear guard circle. This allows you to do three things: deck thin, multi attack and build up soul. The soul building leads into his other skill, which is soul blast 12 and until the end of the fight your opponent can only call normal units. This shuts your opponent from guarding with triggers, and from calling them onto the board. The cost is hefty but once paid it stays active for the remainder of the game.

Deciding on Accel 1 or Accel 2 is a real decision to make when using Gold Paladin. Accel 1 gives you 5k more power, allowing you to hit better numbers with two separate units. Accel 2 draws you a card, helping you dig for more pieces if your hand is weak or if you miss-ride. If your hand is strong enough, it’s usually the right play to go Accel 1. The power buff on two attacks is worth the loss on hand size.

In play you want to be using Agravain’s first skill every turn when possible. The multi-attacking and deck thinning is the main strategy of the deck. Starting from your first grade 3 turn, you should be calling a board and hitting for decent numbers every single turn.  

On Agravain turns, you want to be calling cards that call other cards from deck. Full Cavalier Dragon calls from the top of the deck for a soul blast 1 and gives the vanguard 5k power. The power is important because when using Agravain’s skill, you are unable to boost. Another card you want to be calling is Sagramore, who draws a card and calls a card when placed from hand. These chain calls give you more chances at finding better cards from the top of the deck when using Agravain’s skills. The calls also buff up Arienohl by 15k, making her a 24k beater. Lastly, on four calls, Cunedagius gives the unit he’s boosting an 8k power boost, turning 9ks into 25k columns.

 

The late game for this deck is simple to execute. If you accumulated the 12 soul for Agravain’s skill, then it’s almost always the right play to soul blast 12 and restrict them from using grade 0s. The only time you wouldn’t do the skill is if you can 100% confirm that the opponent has no grade 0s in hand and you need the soul for other skills. At this point, you're calling down the remainder of your hand for your final push. Hand conservation gets tossed out the window, and you play for a lethal turn against your opponent.

Once guard restrict is activated, you need to make sure all your attacks are high enough to where they can’t be intercepted away. Call units in front of Hoel, put units on Accel circles, and swing in for the final turn.

 

Bermuda Triangle

Matchup Difficulty: Moderate

As it stands currently, Melody builds aren’t fast enough to keep up with the aggressive accel meta. The deck has powerful plays post grade 3, but their early game leaves a lot to be desired. In addition, the deck is forced to play upwards of 14 grade 3s, meaning their early hands will have very little shield. Your job is to apply pressure early on, using Hoel and Escrad to make numbers big enough to hit a Force grade 2 for perfect numbers. Once Melody rides grade 3, be on the lookout for Serena. She gives all melody units the ability to draw a card on hit, so when she’s active you should guard attacks and try to keep your opponent's hand size low.

Dimension Police

Matchup Difficulty: Hard

Once Dimension Police gets going, it’s hard to stop them. The deck has huge numbers with multiple criticals, which is something that Agravain is susceptible to. This matchup, like a lot of the other harder matchups, really depends on which player is going first. When going up against Dimension Police, your game plan is to be the aggressor in the matchup. Call down cards early and punish your opponent for running a high amount of grade 3s. Guarding a few of their attacks early on can also allow you to be able to take one of their 2-3 critical hits later.

Gear Chronicle

Matchup Difficulty: Easy

Gear Chronicle has gotten slightly better with the release of the grade 5 cray elemental; however, it’s still leagues behind Gold Paladin. Push them early in the game because their hands will have low amounts of shield value, then you finish them off with 7-8 attacks on Agravain turns. It’s unlikely, but if the game goes on for long enough then you can mega-blast them for the win.

Genesis

Matchup Difficulty: Easy

Genesis is a deck that is very inconsistent for a small amount of payoff. The deck is extremely slow, and even when Genesis high rolls it’s still only decent at best. Against Genesis you want to be staying at low damage, saving your perfect guards for Valkerion or a big Vanguard swing. Genesis is always going Force 1, so with that in mind we can guard the units with 2 critical and take the rest.

Kagero

Matchup Difficulty: Easy

Kagero is one of the lesser played clans, and for good reason. The deck is super slow, almost all their grade 3s require another grade 3 in the soul to work. Going into the matchup, you should aim to create pressure on your first grade 3 ride. If you notice your opponent is playing the Dragonic Blademaster variant, be wary of Wyvern Strike, Doha. This card gets guard restriction on normal units, and when boosted by Wyvern Strike, Garan, has an on hit skill to draw a card and soul charge 1. Against all Kagero decks you want to deny them value from Aermo and Dragnewt when possible. If these cards are on the field and they attack a rear guard, guard the attack. Failure to do so will result in your opponent gaining value that could have been prevented. 

Link Joker

Matchup Difficulty: Moderate

Link Joker is another deck that requires a grade 3 in the soul to make optimal plays. The deck is slow but be aware of the grade 2s that they are playing. Swift Deletor Geali and White Actor Vect are both cards that can gain value off hitting the Vanguard, so be sure to guard those attacks when possible. Also be cautious of any backup Deletor grade 3s that Link Joker might be running. Being one of Agravain’s flaws, if you are forced to ride something else later into the game, you lose a lot offensive pressure. When playing against their Deletors, ride Cavalier or Sagramore until you’re ready for a big push with Agravain.

Neo Nectar

Matchup Difficulty: Hard

With the release of Mysterious Fortune, Neo Nectar has gotten a serious power boost. The Arboros engine gives them card advantage from the grade 1 Arboros dragon, and the grade 2 and 3 dragons can both produce the new 10k plant tokens. The deck has high numbers, multiple criticals, and a solid early game. The matchup is tough, but far from unwinnable. You can use your first weaker wave of attacks to swing at their 10k intercepts and then use the rest of your attacks to swing at their Vanguard. Damage management is very critical in this matchup, as you want to be able to take a high-power attack later in the game. Also keep in mind that the grade 1 Arboros needs to hit to get value, so guard that attack over others.

Royal Paladin

Matchup Difficulty: Moderate

Royal Paladin is a deck with a lot of variance. On one hand, if they have a perfect grade 2 turn with Blaster Blade and then ride into Gancelot the deck is powerful. On the other hand, if Royals open poorly or can’t find their Gancelot, the deck is lack luster. We want to minimize their chances of finding their combo pieces by counterblast starving them, preventing them from drawing cards with Loading Angel or searching for Blaster Blade with Conjurer of Mithril. In tandem you want to be guarding early on so that later in the game you can no guard their 2 critical Blaster Blades. Royal Paladin runs out of cards fast, and once they do, we can punish them with our Agravain swing turn.

Shadow Paladin

Matchup Difficulty: Hard

Shadow Paladin is one of the harder matchups on this list. Shadow Paladin plays require little to no counterblast, allowing Shadows to stay at low damage against you. Going into the midgame, Agravain doesn’t have the defensive capabilities needed to stop multiple re-standing Blaster Darks. Moreover, Danger-lungee Dragon is a card that we have no counter-measures for, your hands simply aren’t big enough to guard a 53k attack with guard restrict consistently. Shadows also draws a decent number of cards, allowing them to keep up with your multi-attack plays. Knowing all this, you must approach the Shadows matchup differently from your standard matchups: you have to mulligan more aggressively and you must make riskier plays. Your windows to win the game are small, but they still exist. During the match you set yourself up to win on the chance that you get lucky, calling a full front row and hitting consecutive front triggers.

Spike Brothers

Matchup Difficulty: Moderate

The gameplay of Spikes is very straight forward. Spikes have a solid early game with Spike Bouncer and Powerback Renaldo calling them early boards. They also have a good follow-up play with Deadheat Bullspike, moving Force markers and drawing cards in tandem with retiring makes the card an all in one threat. However, this is where the deck peaks and all proceeding turns just consist of the same repetitive plays with no true finisher. Playing against Spikes, it's best to guard early, allowing you to take hits on their Bullspike turn and denying them value. Also be on the lookout for Garry Gannon, as his on hit can fix their hands, give them soul, and potentially put a trigger on the bottom of the deck.

Aqua Force

Matchup Difficulty: Easy

Current Aqua Force is trigger-reliant and inconsistent. They need to sequence their grade 3s in a specific order, and do so with no draw power at all. Agravain has two ways of winning this matchup: either by multi-attacking the vanguard and pressuring damage, or swinging at rear guards and starving Aqua Force of resources. The game plan will be based off these factors: who’s going first, how many cards they commit to the board early on, and what vanguard they ride. When you're going first, it’s best to rush them down and defeat them before they get to use Glory Maelstrom's skill. Aqua Force has no way to punish you for calling a stronger board early on, so commit boosters like Hoel and Tron for either value or better numbers.

Gold Paladin

Matchup Difficulty: Hard

The mirror match is mostly decided before the match even begins, with the player going first having a huge advantage. For Agravain mirror matchups, the player going first gets to use Agravain’s skill first for multi-attacks against a grade 2 vanguard. The player going first also accumulates soul faster than the opponent, meaning that the player going first gets to activate Agravain’s soul-blast 12 first as well.

Great Nature

Matchup Difficulty: Hard

With the release of Mysterious Fortune, Great Nature has become a lot more consistent. Isabelle takes the luck out of cards with mill skills like Binoculus Tiger, allowing the Great Nature player to perform both effects regardless of the mill. This gives Great Nature the ability to consistently have high attacks on offense. This paired up with the advantage they get from cards like Leo-pald and Tank Mouse makes the deck strong in the current meta. Your best shot at winning is to take advantage of their weaker early game plays, pushing on grade 1 and grade 2 when appropriate. Great Nature also doesn’t play cards that counter charge, so it’s best to deny them counterblast on turns when you think you can’t deal the 6th damage.

Murakumo

Matchup Difficulty: Hard

Murakumo still remains one of the best decks in the game. Their strength comes from their grade 3 lineup of HYU-GA, Shirayuki, and Hyakki Vogue. Gold Paladin struggles with all of them, as Shirayuki can shut down your low power attacks, HYU-GA can shuffle your board away and Hyakki can make numbers high enough to where you simply can’t guard them. This is probably the toughest matchup in the game currently, and sadly there isn’t much you can do as a Gold Paladin player. The only way to win is if you can rush them down and they so happen to either miss ride or don’t see their Shirayuki in time. In the mulligan you want to dig as hard as possible for g1s and 2s, sending back all triggers and even Agravains. Target all attacks at the vanguard and hope for front triggers.

Narukami

Matchup Difficulty: Hard

Narukami has been one of the top 5 decks in the game for a long time. Gauntlet Buster is one of the best control cards in standard, binding the entire front row for a counterblast and a discard of 1. On top of this, Gauntlet gains 5k power and +1 critical for each front row that’s open. This card is the cornerstone of the deck and what you will be looking to counter play. For starters you should be looking to guard all attacks early, giving yourself low enough damage to take the first Gauntlet Buster attack. Alongside that, you must conserve hand as much as possible. Your board is more than likely be wiped every turn, so you're going to need the hand to refill when that inevitably happens.

Nova Grappler

Matchup Difficulty: Moderate

With the release of God Hand Dragon, Nova Grappler has become a deck less about multi-attacking and more about extremely high numbers. A lot of the units share the same skill of; The power of front trigger effects revealed for your drive check get X amount of power. These skills along with Grit Bengal’s skill to put a front trigger from hand to the top of the deck makes God Hand a real force to be reckoned with. Their game plan is strong, but also linear. Guarding early is a key part of this matchup, as well as not taking attacks with more than 1 critical. Doing so, we turn their super high numbers into nothing more than a single damage. Additionally, during offense you can use your first wave of attacks to swing at their rear guards, and either clear their board or force down a ton of shield value. Counterblast denial is also an effective strategy, as God Hand usually doesn’t play cards that allow them to counter charge.

Pale Moon

Matchup Difficulty: Moderate

Since the release of Phantasmal Steed, Pale Moon has been a serious competitor. The deck's strength come from their grade 3 lineup of Doriane and Luquier. Doriane lets Pale Moon put all their rear guards into soul and draw for every two cards that are put in. Luquier puts all the soul to use, paying counterblast 2 and a discard of 1 to call any number of rear guards from soul to rear guard. This combo leaves them with a healthy hand, a full soul and the ability to call full fields consistently. Playing against Pale Moon, it's important to note that most deck lists don’t play counter chargers. Knowing this, you should look for opportunities later in the game to deny them the two counter blast they need to use Luquier’s skill. Doing so will force Pale Moon to call from hand for a turn, giving you the opening needed to deal the final damage.

Tachikaze

Matchup Difficulty: Hard

Post Raging Tactics Tachikaze is the strongest high roll deck in the meta. If Tachi is going first and draws their boss grade 3 Angerblader, the game can be over before you even get a chance to ride a grade 3. Since you have no way of controlling Tachikaze’s board, you must race them to 6 damage. Play hyper aggressively, call down units every turn and swing at the Vanguard over and over. Doing so will set you up to win the games that they don’t draw Angerblader in time to one turn kill you.

Angel Feather

Matchup Difficulty: Easy

Even after the recent release, Angel Feather is far too slow for the format. Their early game is non-threatening and the new grade 3 (Ergodiel) must be re-rode over and over for Angel Feather to form any kind of pressure. On top of this, Gold Paladin only requires 1 counterblast a turn, maybe 2 at most. With this in mind, you can choose to heal face up cards and keep the amount of face up cards in your damage zone low, making most of the Angel Feather cards less effective. The amount of field control they have isn’t enough to offset the amount of free calls that you do. One of the easiest matchups on the list.

Dark Irregulars

Matchup Difficulty: Moderate

Dark Irregulars are currently the strongest the clan has ever been in Standard, but still not fast enough to keep up with Gold Paladin. The main grade 3, Brufas does a lot for the deck, providing consistent soul charge and some additional power alongside board control. The problem is that that’s all the deck really does until way later in the game when they can resolve Variants Hard Leg. While Hard Leg is an excellent win condition, it takes too long to set up against a faster strategy like Gold Paladin. Dark Irregulars' early game is abysmal, so be sure to pressure them hard on turn 2. After that, keep pressuring damage count as their larger hands are fake and are flooded with grade 3s and combo pieces. Remember, If the game goes long enough to where Hard Leg is active, you can intercept their smaller attacks and call grade 3s to the guardian circle as well as perfect shields without having to activate the effect.

Granblue

Matchup Difficulty: Easy

Granblue has always managed to sneak its way into top tables. Having one of the best grade 2s in the game, Greed Shade, along with massive Skull Dragons and unblockable Violence Flangers makes this deck still a threat in the meta. Since they can simply recur rear guards from the grave, your strategy against them is to ignore all rears and swing at vanguard. Additionally, you must stay at under 5 damage for as long as possible. Being at 5 leaves you susceptible to losing the game to unblockable Violence Flangers. Playing against Granblue is a race against the clock, so ignore counterblast denial and focus on dealing damage.

Megacolony

Matchup Difficulty: Easy

While Megacolonoy has gotten better since the new support, it’s still an easy matchup for Gold Paladin. Their gimmick of milling cards from the top of the deck is mostly irrelevant to our game plan. Megas are also reliant on re-riding their boss grade 3 (Gunningcoleo) over and over, so on the turns that they fail to do that you can punish them severely. If they run the grade 2 Water Gang, then you must attack it and force them to either drop hand size or lose their Water Gang. If the game continues and it doesn’t seem to be ending soon, then you must watch the number of cards in your deck carefully. Plan out worst case scenarios and leave at least enough cards in your deck to perform Twin Drive.

Nubatama

Matchup Difficulty: Moderate

When opposing Nubatama, you have a lot of effective counter-plays to their strategies. Against Hanzo you can use Agravain’s skill to clear your own board and only call a few powerful attackers to the field. This will make his board-wipe skill a lot less effective against you. When facing Jamycongo, your hands are rarely more than 6 cards anyway, making his skill next to useless they have a grade 3 in the soul. Stealth Beast Kokushigarasu is their main threat against us, but we can play around that as well by not calling anything after using Agravain’s skill. Expect a longer game than usual and play for card value over raw numbers.  

Oracle Think Tank

Matchup Difficulty: Easy

Oracle Think Tank, with the new support has transformed from a tempo pressure deck into a full combo deck. This is good for Gold Paladin, as you can pressure them in the early game and either make them drop combo pieces as guard or force them to make awkward plays to stay ahead on tempo. Against OTT, the plan is to kill them before them before they can get to their Victorious Deer turn. You want to be taking as much damage as you can in this matchup, because heal blocking is a valid strategy against OTT. Stay at more damage then your opponent, don’t let them resolve any heal triggers, and defeat them before they manage to combo out.

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